Female Grandmaster Wins Hamilton Rookies Shield!

Posted: 02/03/2011 by Scott in Club News
Tags:
At great expense to the Hamilton Chess Club management, two strong chess players were secretly imported from Europe to test the resolve and current skill level of the Waikato juniors and beginners on 20th Feb. Lara Stock (wgm) and her father Michael Stock (2200+) cleverly kept their relationship, ages – she was over 18 – and identities secret (by using false names) and both convincingly blitzed the field of up and coming but unsuspecting budding chess enthusiasts. We all enjoyed the lessons learned – both on and off the chess board, of honesty and integrity or what happens when there is a lack of it. Stay tuned for the next secret mission of the management – we may be able to exhume Bobby Fischer yet! Some pics of our undercover chess players are below. Update 05/03/2011: You may also wish to follow where else the pair have been, and other Australian/New Zealand reaction here.  

 

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Comments
  1. john worn says:

    makes me feel pretty good,they came to our club in papatoetoe one night .i played her and got a stalemate against her.not bad for 1500 player

  2. Lillian says:

    Maybe we should just ask new players to officially identify themselves when entering our tournaments? And then we could check them out on fide’s website. Would be just a 1 min job.

  3. Gordon says:

    I know Michael, I played against him. He wanted to give up but I had two rourkes more against his King ;).In Germany we know that he has a lot of problems with itself. He established a chess club because he wanted to be the President. He has in the 80’s and 90’s a Elorating from 2400 but a DWZ (German rating system) from 1950. Everyone laughs about that, because you can compare it and noone knows what he did for this rating.;).

  4. Scott says:

    I want to point out that the Hamilton chess club code of ethics (which is similar to the ACF and FIDE code of ethics, and the Ranges chess club code of ethics) has a few items that the German pair have breached. Note I couldn’t lay my hands quickly on an NZCF code of ethics.

    a) Participating in an event under a false name or while under suspension (not in the FIDE ethics, but all the others say this)

    b) Cheating or attempts at cheating during games and tournaments (all mentioned code of ethics say this)

    c) Engaging in conduct likely to injure the reputation of the Hamilton chess club, its events, organisers, its participants or sponsors (all mentioned code of ethics have words with this intent).

    And the Hamilton chess club code of ethics is posted on the walls of the club, where the Rookies event took place, for all to see.

    And so the pair by mis-stating their names have breached (a) and by not declaring their rating (and please do not try to split hairs about what is a rookie, or that they had no NZCF rating), and in Lara’s case, her age, I would consider this means they have breached (b). I know from reading some comments to the various blogs that have reported the affair, that the Hamilton club, the event or the organisers have been the target of criticism – perhaps over time item (c) could also apply.

    Even if you disagree with me about them breaking (b) or (c), it is black and white they have breached (a). They have very badly abused the hospitality previously shown to them by the Hamilton chess club, nor have they proffered an explanation or apology.

    The penalty for breaching the code of ethics (all of the referenced codes) is exclusion from games or events for an appropriate period. The Hamilton committee could determine what is appropriate and apply any ban (from Hamilton events) if they choose.

    AND a note about the idea of holding a rookies event. The intent was to attract grass roots players, those starting out or returning to chess after a break, those with hopes of improving their chess, and to play others of similar strength, and maybe win something along the way.

    Some sports define a rookie as playing for the first year (in usually a professional capacity, ie turned pro from the amateur ranks). As an organiser, I cannot determine if a chess player is ‘new’ to chess, and so using a rating benchmark seems sensible. We can argue as to what that rating level should be, but open tournaments use ratings prizes in a similar manner. And yes even in a rookies event you get players of many years playing experience, but their rating is still under the threshold – an organiser then has to trust the rating system that tells them something about the player’s strength. It would also be hard to find a non-rookie chess player in NZ (or Aus) if we had to define them as professionals.

    Getting back on track, the rating threshold ensures — as best as we can without also introducing age limits — that players will play others of similar strength. So to misrepresent your rating is to disappoint players hoping for a fair contest.

  5. Graham Banks says:

    Any prize over $50 would mean a lot to most NZ youngsters, so it’s a shame if they were cheated out of a chance to earn it.

  6. […] only became clear later was that “Ms Lampert” and “Mr Wagner” should not have been eligible for the contest at all. “Mr Wagner” more frequently goes by the name Michael Stock, and […]

  7. Tom Barrister says:

    Sorry, I don’t agree that it is “good fun”. Two master-level players entered a tournament, pretending to be low-level players. They abused the trust of others and mangled the spirit of fair play. I don’t see anything amusing in it. Nor is this their first time pulling this idiotic prank. The money has nothing to do with it. The others entered expecting a fair contest with players of their own strength. They were denied that.

    People who do such things should be ejected from all national and international federations. We’ll see what the FIDE and the national federations do about it, although it’s not likely that anything will happen.

  8. Paul Postma says:

    Of course it is not nice to enter a tournament under false names…if they did. But to have 2 high rated players in your tournament, could be only good, as the others learn from it! Have some nice games, Paul Postma, Club-captain, Papatoetoe Chess Club

  9. Mike Magnan says:

    I think…” If they are indeed the “stocks” I like em.

  10. Mike Magnan says:

    Chessy…..there are really more important things to think about. Sort of like teachers….an old saying…forgot who said it,,,,The reason they hate and carry on so viciously is because there is nothing to carry on about!” The situation was a lark….nothing to get upset about. They didn’t rob a bank and doled out lessons …..I think it was a fair deal.

  11. chessy says:

    The Stocks are also known for their scandals in Germany. Lara unfortunately is a girl who is dependent on her father and he pushes her from one stupid action into the next. It’s embarrasing to see what he does with her – and it’s embarrasing for all the chess players in Germany.
    For sure they didn’t play to win 55 Dollars. They have much more money as pretty much all of us. But that makes this action even more ridiculous. What it shows: even if you have money you still can be pretty stupid.

  12. Pol says:

    Haha Michael, you have the best jokes ever.
    Wish you best.

  13. Mike Magnan says:

    Hi folks. I don’t play Chess anymore….but I still keep tabs on it and provide artwork for various sites and people. This story really made me laugh. When I was an under 1700 player….I really looked forward to crossing swords with someone a lot better than me. What these two did was perhaps a little dishonest….but they didn’t burn a village down or anything…Chess Fraud is a little harsh…fair…but harsh. They were just having fun. Real Chess Fraud are Sandbaggers..lowering their ratings to play in lower sections….People cheating with computer software…etc. Seems to me they really were not meaning to clean house with a lousy 55 dollars of prize money. Once I found out…I’d just say….”Thanks for the lesson!” haha…Thanks for posting this fun story.

  14. Mike Magnan says:

    Hi folks. I don’t play Chess anymore….but I still keep tabs on it and provide artwork for various sites and people. This story really made me laugh. When I was an under 1700 player….I really looked forward to crossing swords with someone a lot better than me. What these two did was perhaps a little dishonest….but they didn’t burn a village down or anything…Chess Fraud is a little harsh…fair…but harsh. They’re were just having fun. Real Chess Fraud are Sandbaggers..lowering their ratings to play in lower sections….People cheating with computer software…etc. Seems to me they really were not meaning to clean house with a lousy 55 dollars of prize money. Once I found out…I’d just say….”Thats for the lesson!” haha…Thanks for posting this fun story.

  15. Tim says:

    Lara Stock? Here’s a link for you.
    http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4103

    • Lillian says:

      The Lara Stock on your link looks a lot bigger and older than the girl who played at the HA tournament.

  16. […] the website of the Hamilton Chess Club in New Zealand, the organizer of a small club tournament writes: At great expense to the Hamilton […]

  17. Lee says:

    It is a very interesting story. I like it.
    As a local club player. We hope some higher rated players come sometime. We are not professional, we like chess and enjoy what we lost or won.
    Does the secret people make the tournment more fun? I think so.

  18. JoeyJojo says:

    These two tried to do the same thing at the Melbourne Chess Club and were ejected.