Archive for November, 2012

Round 8: A French Twist

Posted: 28/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

Perreux Variation of the Two Knights Defense

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.Ng5 Ne5 6.Qxd4 Nxc4 7.Qxc4 d5

The Perreux Variation of the Two Knights Defense typically arises after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.Ng5. Its name probably derives from the chess club of Perreux-sur-Marne (cercle du Perreux), just outside Paris, where it first became popular in the 19th century. Its sharp tactical themes are easy to grasp and make it attractive to beginning players, but it has also been played by masters who like that many lines lead to interesting endgame positions where good technique can win. As a forcing line, the Perreux Variation also has the advantage of limiting the number of subvariations, so the amount of opening theory is not large. Black is immediately forced to defend his f-pawn by either 5….Ne5 or 5….d5. The resulting positions generally favor White slightly and create interesting games with chances for both sides.

As usual results for the A Division are updated here, and for the B division here. Final two Rounds next week — dont miss out. And feel free to participate in the B division tournament even if you havent done so to date. Remember if we get four Juniors along next week there will be a book prize for the junior with the most points over the two tournaments. In the case of a tie, it will come down to the individual result between the players, and if still tied a special tie break on the last club night of the year.

Round 7: For The Birds

Posted: 28/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

Round 6 was Birds Opening, Kings Fianchetto Defence

  1. f4 Nf6 2. e3 g6 3. b3 Bg7 4. Bb2 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 Nbd7 7. O-O c5

The Bird’s opening has great surprise value! It was popularised by the English master Henry E. Bird towards the end of the 19th century. It has not enjoyed the same popularity as 1.d4 and 1.e4 because it is generally regarded as non developing, does not secure a lasting hold on the centre, and slightly weakens the kings position.  It can however lead to very interesting positions when Black plays a gambit variation (The From gambit) against it with 1. f4 e5 2. fxe5 d6.

It is with extreme sadness that the club acknowledges the untimely death of Michael who has been a loyal member of the club since its early days. Our condolences are extended to his family and loved ones. We remember Michael for his smile and sportsmanship.

Hedgehog For Round Six

Posted: 21/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

Round 6 saw the B division commence another five game Swiss system tournament with the Hedgehog. The Hedgehog is an extremely resilient opening but it is also quite difficult to handle, whether you are playing against it or with it. Black’s plan in the Hedgehog is to shuffle his pieces usefully, preparing the breaks with b5 and d5 as well as generating pressure on the e4 and c4 pawns while ensuring that white cannot break through. White’s task is just as difficult, he must restrain the d5 and b5 breaks as well as countering the threats against his c4 and e4 pawns while trying to find some way to make progress. It is very easy for white to overpress and find himself worse. On the other hand, it is also very easy for black to run out of useful moves and begin to drift, which is not advisable. The key to playing either side of the Hedgehog is an understanding of piece manoeuvring. As ususal results for the A Division are updated here, and for the B division here. More fun and games next week — dont miss out. And feel free to participate in the B division tournament even if you havent done so to date.

1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.g3 b6 4.Bg2 Bb7 5.Nc3 e6 6.0-0 Be7 7.d4 cxd4 8.Qxd4 d6.

Round 5: Zen Chess?

Posted: 21/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

First up last night was a a continuation of the Paulsen variation of the Sicilian defence, variously known as the Szen variation, Dely-Kasparov gambit, or sometimes just the Gary Gambit. The line is characterized by the move 8. d5 for black. The continuation leaves excellent opportunities for both sides for further play. Kasparov used this it to great effect during his world championship match with Karpov in 1985. Last night Gary (Judkins that is, not Kasparov) used it to good effect scoring a win as well.

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.c4 Nf6 7.N1c3 a6 8.Na3 d5

November Rating Lists Are Out

Posted: 18/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

The November ratings lists are out. Member’s ratings have been updated on this page.

Due to NCEA exams we will be in room C4 until the end of the year. Room C4 is located in the Hepburn building (not C block !!). See the map for the location of the Hepburn building.

Round four began with The Orang-Utan opening which  starts out with the move b4. The name derives from the game Tartakower versus Maróczy, New York City 1924. Legend has it that the players had visited the zoo the previous day, and Tartakower had consulted an orangutan there about what move he should open with the next day. Prominent players have employed it on occasion (for example, Richard Réti against Abraham Speijer in Scheveningen 1923 and Boris Spassky against Vasily Smyslov in the 1960 Moscow–Leningrad match). The opening proved much more sedate than the Frankenstein monster of round 3, with 4 wins and a draw for white. Results for the A Division are updated here, and for the B division here. Next week the B division will complete the first round robin and start a second. Remember if we manage four juniors every night then the junior with the most cumulative points wins a book prize.

1. b4 e5 2. Bb2 f6 3. e4 Bxb4 4. Bc4 Ne7 5. f4 d5 6. exd5  exf4 7. Qf3 Bd6 *

Round three provoked howls with the fiendish Frankenstein–Dracula Variation, a branch of the Vienna Game. The opening involves many complications, however with accurate play the opening is very playable for both sides. The variation was given its name by Tim Harding in his 1975 book on the Vienna Game, in which he said that the bloodthirstiness of the character of play was such that “a game between Dracula and the Frankenstein Monster would not seem out of place.” The line is seen extremely infrequently in top-level play, mainly because the Vienna Game is seen so little at top-level play. Ivanchuk used the opening against Anand in Roquebrune in 1992 in a game that ended as a draw.  Last night only Daniel managed to secure a win with black, so the conclusion based on club experience is that the opening favours white

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bc4 Nxe4 4. Qh5 Nd6 5. Bb3 Nc6 6. Nb5 g6 7. Qf3 f5

Welcome Grace As Our Newest Member

Posted: 14/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

Grace Li has joined as our newest (and only female !!) member. We hope that she has started a trend in membership.

Change Of Venue

Posted: 10/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

Due to NCEA exams we will be in room C4 until the end of the year. Room C4 is located in the Hepburn building (not C block !!). See the map for the location of the Hepburn building.

The second unusual opening selected initially wasn’t quite crazy enough and was voted down in favour of an obscure line of the Vienna Game refered to as Mlotkowskis variation.  The Vienna Game is in fact the King’s Gambit delayed:  White plays 2.Nc3 instead of the more popular 2.Nf3 in order to keep the f pawn ready to jump to f4 at the best possible moment.  About 100 years ago the Vienna Game was as popular as the Ruy Lopez, but eventually went out of fashion and is almost forgotten today. Stasch Mlotkowski (1881 – 1943) was an American player whose greatest claim to fame appears to have been a win at the U.S. Open Chess Championship St. Louis 1904. Once again the first seven moves were played out on the board and the players were left to fend for themselves.

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 d5 4. fxe5 Nxe4 5. Nf3 Bb4 6. Be2 O-O 7. O-O Nc6 (diag.)

Shredder evaluates the position as 0.36 for white and suggests Na4 as the next move, although the accepted continuation is 8. Qe1 Bg4 9. d3 d4 10. dxe4 dxc3.

In the end Peter had a win as black and Stefan had a win as white in the A division (results here), while there were three black and one white win in the B grade (results here).  Remember if anyone wants to join from next week they will retrospectively be given byes for rounds one and two

We had 12 for the first round of the Unusual Openings Tournament last night. Hilton, Stefan, Graham, Peter and William form the A grade and are taking part in a five night double round robin. The draw for the next five weeks is here. William took the bye for round one. In the B division we have 8 players that will run in two back to back five round Swiss System Tournaments. If anyone wants to join from next week they will retrospectively be given byes for rounds one and two. The B division crosstable is here.

The first Unusual Opening selected was the Fegatello Attack which Hilton correctly informed us also goes by the exotic name of the Fried Liver Opening. (The name derives from an Italian idiom meaning “dead as a piece of liver”). In the opening White sacrifices a knight for a superficially impressive attack on Black’s king. The first seven moves of the opening were played out on the board and then the players were left to fend for themselves

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. d4 Be6 7. Nxe6 fxe6 (diag.)

The Fried Liver has been known for many centuries, the first known game score being from Rome in 1610. Because defence is harder to play than attack in this variation when given short time limits, the Fried Liver is considered dangerous for Black if using a short time control. In games with longer time limits Black has a better opportunity to refute the White sacrifice. As it turned out in the B division there were four white victories. In the A grade Peter had a win as white, and Stefan had a win as black.

Theme For The Next Five Weeeks

Posted: 05/11/2012 by Ian in Club News

Ever wanted to play the Freiss Attack, or the Motzko variation of the Morphy Defence? How about the Quaade Gambit?

Starting tomorrow night the theme is going to be “Unusual Openings”

There will be two parallel competitions running. The aristocracy (William, Hilton, Stefan, Graham, and Peter) are going to play a double round robin over five weeks.

Depending on numbers the rest of us will play off in a couple of Swiss System Tournaments back to back. As an incentive if there are four or more Juniors involved for each of the next five nights  there will be a book prize for first and second Junior based on cumulative points. (No prizes if we don’t manage that many Juniors numbers due to exams).

There will be two games per night with a different unusual opening (selected from Modern Chess Openings by one of the Juniors, with the first seven moves for each side played out on the board) for each. Time control will be 20 + 3.

 

So .. perhaps it is to be Von Gottschall’s Attack in the Scotch Game, or maybe the Siesta Variation of the Steinitz Defence: Come along to find out